December 08, 2021, 08:45:25 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Manky Monkey Motors Merchandise now available Cool Items at cool prices http://www.mankymonkeymotors.co.uk/merchandise.html
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Gallery Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
Author Topic: The Scottish Highlands  (Read 11688 times)
tbone
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 130
Posts: 4548



« on: March 29, 2010, 09:43:33 AM »

If your looking for peace and quite, a place to get away from it all, then A Ghaidhealtachd is for you.
A Ghaidhealtachd is Scottish Gaelic, translated it means `the place where Gaelic is spoken`, and refers predominantly to the North West region of Scotland and beyond to the Outer Hebrides and Orkney islands.
The area is dominated by several mountain ranges seperated by sprawling glens and is one of the most sparsly populated areas in europe thanks to several factors including outlawing the traditional highland way of life after the Jacobite rising in 1745, and the Highland Clearances.
Although several other areas come close, i look upon the Highlands as the last true `wilderness` within the British isles, a place where, if you look hard enough, you will still see traditional British wildlife, and a place that i think, could and should see a return of some species that no longer inhabit our countryside.
Now, i could wax on lyricaly, but no amount of my ramblings or photoghraphs could do justice to the total tranquility you feel, or the awe inspireing beauty of the scenery, so what follows is a very small taste of what you can find in A Ghaidhealtachd.

« Last Edit: March 29, 2010, 09:53:47 AM by tbone » Logged

NO I WON`T. aye ok then, i will
tbone
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 130
Posts: 4548



« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2010, 09:59:48 AM »

The border to Scotland is 250 miles from my house, and the highlands are around the same distance from the border, so we travelled a total of 547 miles to a very small place called Embro , on the North East coast, above Inverness.
On the way up, we glimpsed some of the scenery that lay in store for us.
Logged

NO I WON`T. aye ok then, i will
tbone
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 130
Posts: 4548



« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2010, 10:07:40 AM »

This is Carr Bridge, known as The Old Packhorse Bridge at Lynne of Dalrachney.
The bridge was badly damaged in the 18th century and again during the famous flood of August 1829 causing it to now look like this.
Logged

NO I WON`T. aye ok then, i will
tbone
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 130
Posts: 4548



« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2010, 10:11:32 AM »

Moy Viaduct is the last remaining timber viaduct on Scotlands mainland railways and is a Grade A listed historical structure.
Logged

NO I WON`T. aye ok then, i will
tbone
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 130
Posts: 4548



« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2010, 10:19:07 AM »

This is Dunrobin Castle, home to the Earls and Dukes of Sutherland for over 700 years, and is the factual and spiritual home of Clan Sutherland. (I can think of at least 2 famous people that would have ancestral links to the castle).
Sadly it was closed when we visited, most `attractions` tend to use easter as the start of the season, so, very few open before then.
Logged

NO I WON`T. aye ok then, i will
tbone
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 130
Posts: 4548



« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2010, 10:23:31 AM »

A glimpse of the wildlife. Scotland is home to both Common and Grey seal populations, ( as well as pods of dolphins, at the right time of year), despite the name, Common seals are not, so these were probably Grey`s.
Happily sunning themselves on a sandbank in a small inlet off the North Sea.
Logged

NO I WON`T. aye ok then, i will
tbone
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 130
Posts: 4548



« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2010, 10:29:19 AM »

Neil Gunn was a Scottish novellist/poet born in the small fishing village of Dunbeath.
This statue, Kenn and the Salmon is situated at the harbour in Dunbeath, and has been placed there in his memory.
Logged

NO I WON`T. aye ok then, i will
tbone
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 130
Posts: 4548



« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2010, 10:31:15 AM »

Dunnet Head, the most northerly point in mainland Britain.
Logged

NO I WON`T. aye ok then, i will
tbone
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 130
Posts: 4548



« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2010, 10:44:54 AM »

Flagstones were quarried at Castlehill, Flagstones are actualy sandstone, the name Flagstone comes from the way the Sandstone is easily split into thin slices or `flags`, which itself is derived from the Norse word `flaga` meaning flag.
You can follow the `flagstone trail` at Castlehill, and although as an `attraction` it could be better, its well worth a visit if your in the area.
Logged

NO I WON`T. aye ok then, i will
tbone
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 130
Posts: 4548



« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2010, 10:51:25 AM »

This Stag was huge, we came accross him in a small clearing in a forest, the trouble with wildlife is that they dont readily pose for pictures, so it was a question of grabbing whatever shot i could.
I know what your thinking, theres a fence, he`s takin that at the zoo!
No i havent, you`ll see these fences running the length of quite a few of the highland roads, they are used to `control` the deer, to keep them off roads or out of areas where re planting has been carried out.
Logged

NO I WON`T. aye ok then, i will
tbone
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 130
Posts: 4548



« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2010, 11:00:29 AM »

This was bloody good!
Ok the picture itself isn`t, its what the camera didnt capture that is!
We were tootling along through one of the many glens when i spotted this herd of deer, quite a large herd of around 20 animals.
I`d taken a couple of distance shoots and had just zoomed in to take this, as i did so, the deer spooked and turned then trotted away. Just to the right, out of shot is a BLOODY HUGE eagle, on the ground and preparing to take off.
I didnt see it at first, Mrs T did though, a beating of enormous outstreatched wings then slowly a forward motion as he took to the air.
A beautifull sight and one of many times that i wished i had a better camera!
Logged

NO I WON`T. aye ok then, i will
tbone
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 130
Posts: 4548



« Reply #11 on: March 29, 2010, 11:11:25 AM »

A Heilan Coo  Grin
Logged

NO I WON`T. aye ok then, i will
Manky Monkey
Administrator
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 265
Posts: 55102



WWW
« Reply #12 on: March 29, 2010, 11:22:49 AM »

Some lovely shots there TB. Told you you like it up there didn't we. I've visited the Highlands 5 times now I think, always going in early October, when the tourists & infamous midges have gone, but the weather's still good. I've sat on stunning, utterly deserted sandy beaches in T shirts in October up there.
It really is a completely different country isn't it. Nothing like the rest of Britain. Wildly, ruggedly beautiful.
Must go again soon.
Logged

On the last freedom moped out of Nowhere City.
tbone
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 130
Posts: 4548



« Reply #13 on: March 29, 2010, 11:37:44 AM »

This sign is at the foot of the Bealach na Ba or Pass of the cattle.
The Bealach na Ba rises to 2053ft above sea level in about five miles, and is the most spectacular pass in Scotland. It also provides some of the most challenging driving in the country. It is single track throughout and the warning signs at its foot, including one (which is unique in Scotland) deterring learner drivers, should be taken seriously. Another warns that the road is often closed in winter conditions.
I have to admit.....i was scared.
Seriously, i did not like start of the drive down one little bit. Going up was fine, reached the top and saw the sights, then saw the sheer drop off the side of the road down.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2010, 04:17:31 PM by tbone » Logged

NO I WON`T. aye ok then, i will
tbone
Hero Member
*****

Karma: 130
Posts: 4548



« Reply #14 on: March 29, 2010, 11:41:57 AM »

Some lovely shots there TB. Told you you like it up there didn't we. I've visited the Highlands 5 times now I think, always going in early October, when the tourists & infamous midges have gone, but the weather's still good. I've sat on stunning, utterly deserted sandy beaches in T shirts in October up there.
It really is a completely different country isn't it. Nothing like the rest of Britain. Wildly, ruggedly beautiful.
Must go again soon.

This was our 2nd visit, the first was around 6 years ago, had beautiful sunshine all week while it snowed at home  Grin.
Like yourself, i prefer to holiday `out of season`, although this does sometimes mean missing out on some `attractions`, but we dont mind.
Logged

NO I WON`T. aye ok then, i will
Pages: [1] 2
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.18 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!